Challenging Destiny Challenging Destiny
New Fantasy & Science Fiction

Number 4, October 1998

[magazine cover]

Cover illustration by Clifford VanMeter

Reviews

Matt Hayes, on the Spicy Green Iguana web site, says "Challenging Destiny has everything going for it. Great reading, entertaining illustrations and quality interviews." You can read the entire review here.

Michael H. Payne reviews this issue on the Tangent web site. His favourite story is "Queen of Silver Clouds" by Bonnie Mercure, and he says "A quiet little story, gently earnest, not a cynical word in it."

John Francis Haines reviews this issue on the New Hope International Review web site. You can read the entire review here.

Cathy Buburuz, in the Star Anthology (December 1998), says "The colorful image of an otherworldly sportsman, looking somewhat like a futuristic Daniel Boone or Davey Crockett, graces the stiff, high gloss cover by the talented Cliff VanMeter. The cover art alone makes this a fine addition to any private library."


Here are some sneak previews of the stories you'll find in the fourth issue of Challenging Destiny:

Hard Efortt by Timothy Carter
illustrated by Clifford VanMeter

In the future, unemployment is a crime. If you can't find work within five months, you get deported. Lieutenant Job Efortt is a Deporter, and he believes in what he does. Even when one of the people he has to deport is his own son...

illustration for Hard Efortt by Clifford VanMeter

Turnabout by Nicholas Pollotta & Phil Foglio
illustrated by Kristy L. Razo

One fine summer evening, Prof. Felix Einstein and Lord Benjamin Carstairs are taking their constitutional through the forest when suddenly a monstrous shape thunderously lands in the clearing before them. It's the sphinx, who's up to her old tricks. But these men know the answers to her questions, and they even have a question of their own...

Queen of Silver Clouds by Bonnie Mercure
illustrated by Cathy Buburuz

The Queen is guide and advisor to the unborn, and helps them cross over into the world of the mortals. Most of the unborn patiently wait their turn. But the time has come for Nebulance, her oldest friend, to be born. He doesn't want to leave, and she doesn't want him to go...

illustration for Queen of Silver Clouds by Cathy Buburuz

When the Fog Came by Carl Mills
illustrated by Jeff Roberts

John is superintendent for a quiet little cottage community. But when the unnaturally dense fog comes, and people can't see one another, they do things they wouldn't normally do. John hears gunshots, and other incredible noises. He even hears a voice calling him out of the fog...

The Way of the World (Part 2 of 2) by Erik Allen Elness
illustrated by Alfred L. Jones

With his uncle Randall incapacitated by some unknown magic, Preston assumes the role of Chancellor. His first job: to forge an agreement between the dragons and the Ajaius, the human magic-users. Preston has the requisite knowledge of magic, but it seems like there's a lot going on that he doesn't know about...

plus

Journeys to Dune review by James Schellenberg

Frank Herbert's original novel Dune, published in 1965, won both the Hugo and Nebula awards. There followed five more novels, a movie, and three computer games. And more is on the way... James reviews all of these, and The Making of Dune.

Wizards, Vampires & a Cat: From the Imagination of Tanya Huff interview by James Schellenberg & David M. Switzer

Tanya Huff broke into the fantasy field in 1988 with her novel Child of the Grove. Her two main series are the Blood series, about private investigator Vicki Nelson and her vampire friends; and the Quarters series, about a world in which earth, air, water, and fire are the four types of magic. Her most recent book is Summon the Keeper, a very funny satire of horror and fantasy.

Everything is Permanent editorial by Robert P. Switzer

Bob starts with the premise that all of time currently exists -- that you could visit any time in the past or future if you had a time machine. In other words, everything is permanent. He examines the implications of this idea. Do we all have a destiny, or can we indeed challenge it?


Last modified: December 2, 2001

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